fbpx

Tag: plymouth chiropractors

The Adjustment

The Adjustment

What do chiropractors do, and how can we help you? Chiropractors are experts of the spine. We go to school for a minimum of 3 years prior to being accepted into chiropractic college. From there, we go through a rigorous doctorate degree that encompasses many […]

Prehab for Runners

Prehab for Runners

Spring Into Running By Daniel Hounjet, Intern, Core Health As the snow melts and weather turns people are eager to get outside and start running.Because of the climate we live in many people either choose not to run in the winter or they run indoor […]

Common causes for Headaches and Neck pain

Common causes for Headaches and Neck pain

Chiropractic Treatment for Headaches and Neck Pain

At one time or another, everyone has experienced the unwelcome, throbbing pain of a headache. Some headaches may blindside you; there seems to be no explanation for their occurrence. Others come on gradually over the span of hours or days. The number of headache presentations is outweighed only by the number of causes. Due to the numerous potential triggers, it can often be difficult to narrow it down to the true culprit. Doing so, however, is the key to resolving headaches for the long term. Below, you will find descriptions of various headache triggers, some common and some lesser known, in addition to ways to combat and prevent their occurrence.

Subluxation/Misalignment of the Spine

Headaches and mechanical neck pain are the bread and butter of chiropractic. So many people suffer from chronic headaches that can be easily fixed through a series of adjustments. Often, the cause of neck pain and headaches is stress on the nervous system due to misalignment of the cervical vertebrae. When vertebrae move improperly, the mechanics of the entire head and neck are disrupted. This results in compensations in head position and movement, as well as an increase in muscle tone. Headaches are the culmination of this mechanical and postural dysfunction.

The Fix: Have a chiropractor check your spine and adjust any subluxations in the body. They can also perform manual therapy to any hypertonic musculature of the head and neck. Your chiropractor may also refer you for other therapies, including acupuncture or massage, as they see fit.

Stress & Muscle Tension

When stressed, people tend to hold their shoulders high and clench their jaws. All of this is done unconsciously, of course. Right now, be mindful of your shoulders. Try to lower them. If you can relax your shoulders and they drop, you were likely holding up without even realizing it. The same goes for clenching the jaw. Many people do this while they sleep, resulting in sustained tension in the jaw and temples. All of this upper back, neck and jaw tension leads to trigger points and the radiation of pain into different areas of the body, namely, the head and neck.

Though your upper body muscle tension may not be due to psychological stress, it can be due to the physical stressors of daily activity. Many people who work in jobs which require repetitive upper extremity motion will experience tension type headaches. Athletes involved in impact sports or completing high repetition exercises can also succumb to tension headaches.

The Fix: Identify the source of stress and create a plan to remove or decrease it. If this isn’t feasible, a plan to manage or relieve yourself of stress throughout or at the end of the day can be helpful. This might include taking mini breaks at work, meditation, exercise, baths or scheduling time out for yourself. Also, be mindful of tensing the shoulders and jaw, aiming to keep them relaxed as possible.

Mobility and recovery is key for the athlete. Using a lacrosse ball or roller after a workout, in combination with stretching, will offset tightness. Exercise is a huge stress to the body, make sure you are recovering sufficiently with nutrient dense meals and good sleep.

Allergies, Low Blood Sugar & Dehydration

Food and environmental allergies trigger an immune response in the body. The result of this immune response is systemic inflammation. This inflammatory response can often cause a headache. The body uses the headache as a warning sign to the body, indicating that something is wrong and a larger issue needs to be addressed.

If you’re attempting the new intermittent fasting trend or just forgot to eat a meal or two, you may feel a headache coming on. Fasting too long, dieting too hard or not eating enough can cause the blood sugar to enter a hypoglycaemic range. When the blood sugar gets too low, a headache can ensue. Keep your body hydrated, too! Low hydration and electrolyte levels are notorious for triggering headaches.

The Fix: Discovering the food that sets the body awry is not always easy. It can often require an elimination diet, in which foods that are traditionally more allergenic are removed for a period time to determine the body’s response without them. Allergy tests or panels can also be done to determine food allergies. If low blood sugar or dehydration is the culprit, get some healthy, nutritious food & water in your body and see if the headache subsides once the values have returned to a normal range.

Seek Help

Regardless of the trigger, at the end of the day you are still experiencing the pain of a headache, and you just want to be rid of it! Research supports the use of chiropractic for headache reduction and elimination. Go see one! It is the safest, most effective course of treatment and should be the first line of defence against headache symptoms. Your DC will evaluate your symptoms and spine and provide you with appropriate treatment and advice. You have nothing to lose except your nagging headache.

Identifying and Treating Low Back Pain

Identifying and Treating Low Back Pain

Low back Pain:  Causes and Treatment Low back pain (LBP) is the most common musculoskeletal complaint in the US, and the condition most commonly treated in the chiropractic office. Though almost everyone has dealt with low back pain at some point in their lives, the […]

Upper Cross Syndrome, Back pain, and Trap Dominance

Upper Cross Syndrome, Back pain, and Trap Dominance

Upper Cross Syndrome & Trap Dominance Upper Cross Syndrome (UCS) is a group of symptoms that leads to muscle imbalances and pain the upper shoulders and neck. It is typically seen in people with poor, slumped posture and those who spend their days at desks […]

Knee Pain | The Great Myth of Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome

Knee Pain | The Great Myth of Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome

Anterior knee pain, often diagnosed as Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome (PFPS), is a common complaint in the chiropractic office. This complaint is typically from runners and other endurance athletes who are overtraining, but can also be due to increased load on joints and repetitive impact from running or jumping. The pain will be centralized to the front of the knee, feel achy, and get worse when moving up or down stairs. It may also ache while sitting for prolonged periods.

The knee is a hinge join connecting the femur to the tibia, and allowing for flexion and extension. The patella, or knee cap, is a bone that receives the quadriceps tendon and links it across the knee joint to the tibia via the patellar tendon. It also acts to protect the articular surface of the knee. As the knee moves through its range of motion, the patella moves in combination, tracking up and down, tilting and rotating to help facilitate proper body mechanics. Traditionally, anterior knee pain has been attributed to improper tracking of the patella. It is theorized that the muscles acting on the patella are weak or tight, pulling it off course. The issue with this theory, however, is that a clear definition of a proper tracking motion has not been established. In fact, many studies have found that every individual’s patellar tracking pattern may be distinct, and a normal movement path many not actually exist. A research study conducted in 2006 at Queen’s University in Canada discovered that there is no evidence to link aberrant patellar motion to knee pain. This means there is a good chance that if you assessed the patellar movement of healthy knees, you would see patterns similar to those in pathologic knees.

So, if the knee cap is not the culprit, then what is? Why has this pain occurred and where is it coming from? The answer is to look beyond the site of pain and assess the body as a whole. Currently, the gold standard treatment for this issue is to strengthen the vastus medialis, one of the muscles comprising the quadriceps. This is an effective treatment if weakness of this muscle is the legitimate cause of the pain. If it is not the cause, though, then improving the strength of it will do little to improve the situation. The practitioner should perform a comprehensive assessment of the lower limb; the foot, ankle, knee, and hip joints should all be assessed for subluxation and aberrant motion, and the muscles checked for hypertonicity and weakness. They should also be working to find which motions or regions of muscle reproduce, exacerbate, or relieve the knee pain. From here, a proper solution can be provided and an effective treatment plan can be developed. This may include initial reduced activity or a period of time away from sport, adjustments, stretching, instrument assisted soft tissue work (FAKTR, Graston), active release therapy, massage & resistance exercises.

core health knee pain

The following are potential causes of PFPS:

  • Weakness of the quadriceps muscles
  • Tightness of the iliotibial (IT) band
  • Inhibited or hypertonic gluteal muscles
  • Hypertonicity of the quadriceps, hamstrings and/or calves

By Taylor Meyers

Chiropractic and Massage, Partners in Wellness

Chiropractic and Massage, Partners in Wellness

Deep Tissue Massage  in conjunction with the Chiropractic adjustment Chiropractic and massage therapy work together simultaneously creating a synergistic effect resulting in much faster recovery time. Correction of one’s structure often occurs more easily and with less discomfort when both modalities are used together. The […]

Posture Fix for Back and Neck pain

Posture Fix for Back and Neck pain

Sitting properly to reduce back pain Neck and back pain due to posture is a growing problem.  A vast majority of our patients present with symptoms that arise from cumulative stress placed on the body through poor ergonomics. Did you know that the average full-time […]

Don’t let me catch you slouching! Posture and what to do about it

Don’t let me catch you slouching! Posture and what to do about it

Ergonomic checklist

By now we’ve heard the term text neck , seen the photos of people slouched over a computer or craning their necks down at their phone, may have even had the ergonomic breakdown at work. But what are the implications of poor posture and how can it really affect you.

Before we get too far into the do’s and don’ts let’s get a better understanding of what bad posture is actually doing to your spine.   As you progress through development from infancy to sitting, sitting to crawling, crawling to standing, and standing to walking- running- jumping- etc., you are changing the dynamic of how your body holds and distrubutes weight throughout each phase.  In doing so, you form 3 primary curves of the spine.  First is the lordodic cervical curve that would look like a reverse c-shape from the side, second the kyphotic thoracic spine, and finally the lordotic lumbar spine.  Each curve serving a purpose for the overall stability of the spine and all the mechanisms that attach and rely upon this structure to function.  This shape and form is very intentional as our bodies are much smarter innately than we give them credit.   By forming this intentional shape, our weight is evenly distrubuted from our head down to our toes to transfer weight and force evenly from the spine to the extremities and allowing for the muscles, tendons, and ligments to peform their duties without becoming stressed. By changing any one of these shapes or curves in the spine, we thus alter the stress load throughout the entirety of the spine.   So by losing that curve in your neck or flexing your head down looking at your phone, you’re implicating every function thereafter that relies upon the shape.  Leading to tightness in the cervical flexor muscles (front of the neck)  weakening and overusing the cervical extensors muscles in the back of the neck and upper shoulders which leads to stiffness, tension, pain, headaches, loss of mobility, and eventually structural breakdown or degeneration of the spine. This is happening at an alarming rate as patients are presenting at as early as 18-20 years of age with symptoms consistent with the breakdown that was just described.  I’ve used the cervical spine as my example for the sake of simplicity but you could go through this process with each region of the spine and each region will be affected by the other once things begin to breakdown.

We all know technology is going no where and chances are we are going to spend more time sitting, in front of computer or phone than ever before.  So make the changes now to avoid having to deal with the complications later.

Posture checkpoints-

Head and neck must remain neutral – eyes level to the horizon

Elbows low and in contact with the torso

Shoulders back

Get up and move around!  Take breaks, alternate with standing if you have the option.

Exercising consistently is the most beneficial pro active measure you can take against bad posture

Focus on strengthening the upper back and core musculature to most efficiently offset negative stress due to posture

Please let me know if you would like to go over any posture related questions or concerns on your next visit.

Move Welll!