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Tag: posture

The Adjustment

The Adjustment

What do chiropractors do, and how can we help you? Chiropractors are experts of the spine. We go to school for a minimum of 3 years prior to being accepted into chiropractic college. From there, we go through a rigorous doctorate degree that encompasses many […]

Prehab for Runners

Prehab for Runners

Spring Into Running By Daniel Hounjet, Intern, Core Health As the snow melts and weather turns people are eager to get outside and start running.Because of the climate we live in many people either choose not to run in the winter or they run indoor […]

Posterior Chain

Posterior Chain

Are you working your butt off… literally?

The posterior chain muscles may be the most important group of muscles when it comes to daily performance as an athlete or an average Joe. The posterior chain of muscles in the hip include the glutes, hamstrings and the posterior core/para-spinals; and they are responsible for stabilizing and moving the hip and pelvis. They are often neglected in strength training causing muscular imbalance and anterior chain dominance, which can lead to low back pain and instability. So, if you have had some sort of low back pain, you are most likely not working your butt off as much as you thought.

Importance of Posterior Chain Muscles

When your hip joint and its muscles fail to function, your lumbar spine takes over movements that it shouldn’t which can cause low back pain. The glutes are often the most affected by the lack of hip mobility, often getting inhibited or unused. Posterior chain muscles are crucial to full functioning hips. Many Crossfit movements require powerful hips, which really means a powerful posterior chain. The power positions in the Olympic weightlifting movements, deadlifts, kettlebell swings, rowing, and even the push press all generate power from your hips. Without full functioning hip muscles, these movements will lack efficiency and cause pain.

How do I know if I have a weak posterior chain?

Along with pain there are some postural signs that can be seen that can help us identify weaknesses. One of these signs are an anterior pelvic tilt or lower cross syndrome (LCS). LCS can be seen in individuals with a hyperlordotic curve in their lumbar spine, which is caused by tight/over used anterior muscles (rectus femoris, iliopsoas, and abdominals) and weak/inhibited posterior chain muscles (hamstrings, glutes).

The Fix

Just like with UCS, we want to address the short muscles first then strengthen the weak. Stretching and mobilizing the rectus femoris and hip flexors (refer to Low Back Pain post). Next, we want to strengthen the posterior chain muscles. The main movement we want to get to activate all the posterior chain muscles is the hip hinge. This can be seen in exercises like the “Good Morning”, kettlebell swings and deadlifts. The combination of the stretching and strengthening will help take some tension off the anterior muscles, make the posterior muscles fire correctly and bring full mobility back into your hip joint and stability to your low back.

-Curtis Hoang

 

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Shoulder Impingement Syndrome:  Causes, symptoms, and treatment

Shoulder Impingement Syndrome: Causes, symptoms, and treatment

Shoulder Impingement Syndrome, a common cause for shoulder pain. Shoulder Impingement Syndrome, also known as Swimmer’s or Thrower’s shoulder, is a common over-use condition that occurs when the shoulder bursa or rotator cuff tendons become compressed within the shoulder joint. The shoulder joint is comprised […]

Chiropractic and Massage, Partners in Wellness

Chiropractic and Massage, Partners in Wellness

Deep Tissue Massage  in conjunction with the Chiropractic adjustment Chiropractic and massage therapy work together simultaneously creating a synergistic effect resulting in much faster recovery time. Correction of one’s structure often occurs more easily and with less discomfort when both modalities are used together. The […]

Posture Fix for Back and Neck pain

Posture Fix for Back and Neck pain

Sitting properly to reduce back pain

Neck and back pain due to posture is a growing problem.  A vast majority of our patients present with symptoms that arise from cumulative stress placed on the body through poor ergonomics.

Did you know that the average full-time worker spends 2/3 of their day sitting? Often thought of us a comfortable place of respite, chairs and the time we spend in them can greatly impact our bodies, forcing them into anatomically unsound positions. Hours on end spent in chairs is slowly crippling our bodies and our health. Your hamstrings shorten, your hips lose their ability to straighten and therefore generate power, and your lumbar-spine is forced to support the weight of your slouching-body. Unfortunately, in this modern age of instant communication, advanced medicine, and the ability to access information on the internet by just a few clicks of a button, much of this is unavoidable. Our jobs are much more sedentary than they used to be. So what is the modern day desk warrior to do?

While there is no perfect solution, here are some tips to keep your body as healthy as possible throughout the workday:

1. Be aware of your posture.

The easiest way to put yourself into a sound position without thinking about 40 checkpoints is to pay attention to your elbows.

 Yes your elbows.  If my elbows are in a good position in relation to my torso, then my shoulders are neutral, neutral shoulders gives a high likelihood to a neutral cervical spine and this keeps your upper body is in an ideal position with minimal tension levels. Don’t adjust your neck to see the screen. Instead adjust your chair and computer monitor. If you have to crane your neck too far downwards to see your computer screen, you naturally force your pelvis/lumbar to round and cave in.

2. Work some desk stretches into your daily routine.

We should be cultivating mobility daily regardless of where we are, so why not do it at your desk? And yes a standing desk or a desk that has the ability to adjust up and down is best but I realize it is a convenience that is not afforded at all work places, so if you don’t have the luxury then proceed to #3.

3. Stand up regularly.

Who will notice (or even care) if you stand up once every 30 minutes and get yourself out of that position of flexion. Many studies have shown benefits of leaving your desk at periodic intervals to walk around. Just remember to come back!

4. Be active OUTSIDE OF WORK.

As tempting as it is to get home and retire to the couch, use your time outside of work to MOVE your body the way it’s meant to be moved. Try some functional movement workouts or yoga. You will be surprised to find you actually feel better and more energized.

I hope these tips are helpful.

Visit www.corechiroclinics.com to learn about all the of the services we offer to help our patients

MOVE WELL, EAT WELL, BE WELL.

Don’t let me catch you slouching! Posture and what to do about it

Don’t let me catch you slouching! Posture and what to do about it

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